Written in the Stars


Horoscope or Astrology: Our lives are written in the stars, or are they? The cosmos are composed of the same matter we are. So if what is outside is inside of us, would the position of the stars affect our mood? Cynics would say absolutely nothing. However there is a mysticism to the stars and the galaxy. The moon controls the tides. Through thousands of years of evolution breeding and fertility cycles have been guided by the moon. In recent years the ever growing New Age Spirituality has placed heavy importance on the balance of the stars. The thought that our fate lies in the stars and the balance of the universe is spiritual and scientific at the same time. However, how do we balance the bland horoscope with cosmic astrology? Let’s start by defining each. The history of horoscopes began recently in human history. R.H. Naylor is credited for creating the first horoscope. He was assistant to high-society neo-shaman, Cheiro (born William Warner, a decidedly less shamanistic name), who’d read the palms of Mark Twain, Grover Cleveland, and Winston Churchill, and who was routinely tapped to do celebrity star charts. At the time Cheiro was not available to write the natal chart of newly born Princess Margaret. At that time, his assistant R.H. Naylor took up the responsibility of reporting on her natal chart. A natal chart is the chart of the stars and planets and their position at the time of a persons birth. The position in which the stars and planets present fill archetypes to describe personalities and life events. In his report, he noted tremendous ‘eventful’ life events including “events of tremendous importance to the Royal Family and the nation will come about near her seventh year”. This prophecy later turned out to correspond to around the time that her uncle, King

Edward VIII, abdicated the throne to her father. While celebrity horoscopes weren’t necessarily a new concept, it was Naylor’s natal chart of Princess Margaret that was a tipping point in the exploding popularity of horoscopes. Later Naylor predicted a variety of forecasts including a ‘British aircraft will be in danger’ in between October 8 and 15. Later on October 5th, A British airship crashed outside Paris killing 48 of the 54 passengers on board. This was one of the other forecasts that cemented Naylor’s columns in popularity. The popularity of the column put the daily horoscope in high demand. Today’s horoscopes do not trace out star patterns but rather are just random sentences to connect to the audience. However I am not one to say that the daily horoscope can’t predict your day. Divine timing happens magically so if you are reading it as a sign, it may as well be one. Now let’s get into actual astrology. Astrology dates back to the beginning of human civilization. The Babylonians looked to the stars for guidance and protection. Tracking the stars and their movement across the sky corresponded with a variety of natural events such as river flooding, beginning of spring, and other natural phenomena. The Bayblonians applied myths and gods to the stars. This is the beginning of the Zodiac signs. Ancient Babylonians also used to read the entrails and liver spots on a variety of sacrifices to understand the changing of seasons or to predict crop bounty that year. As the Earth rotates on its axis, the stars shift their position in the sky. The rising of the Sirius star indicated in Ancient Egypt the flooding of the Nile, which occurred normally during mid-July. Nearly every ancient civilization used the stars for guidance. Ancient Chinese astronomers would look to the stars to indicate how the luck of emperors would

change seasonally. However it was the divination of the movement of the stars that helped Alexander the Great to conquer Egypt....

....Read the rest of this article in the next edition of Fruitybinature Magazine...

1 view0 comments